NCCA Blog

Monday, June 13, 2011 - 2:31pm

Evelyn Torton Beck began her college career at Brooklyn College in 1950, and fifty four years later her formal education may have reached its peak when she received her second Ph.D., this one in Clinical Psychology. A life-long learner, Dr. Beck’s desire to learn was only heightened by the intervening years she spent as a professor of literature of women’s studies at the University of Wisconsin and then at the University of Maryland. Today, having left the higher education scene behind for...

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Beautiful Minds
Monday, June 13, 2011 - 11:14am

Thank you to everyone who submitted a 2011 Beautiful Minds nomination.  The high number of submissions was only matched by the high quality of the stories of people using aging as an opportunity to do something extraordinary with their minds. Congratulations to the 16 semifinalists selected!

Now we ask you to visit beautiful-minds.com to help select this year's "People's Choice." The candidate with the most votes will go on to be named one of our 10 Beautiful Minds. Read, be inspired...

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Beautiful Minds
Friday, May 27, 2011 - 11:32am

As the month of May winds to a close, NCCA would like to take a moment to honor all our older adults as our "keepers of the culture" who enrich, strengthen and inspire our lives and the communities we live in!

One particularly exciting event this month was a "Creative Conversation" hosted by NCCA member Creative Arts and Aging Network in Philadelphia in conjunction with the month-long...

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Event
Tuesday, May 10, 2011 - 2:24pm

At the age of 86, Clarence Johnston is too busy living in the present to talk much about his past.  As a world-renowned jazz drummer he has played over 50 years, traveling and performing with jazz artists Miles Davis, John Coltrane and Dinah Washington among many others. ...

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Beautiful Minds
Friday, April 22, 2011 - 11:28am

Pictures of postcards created by children

 

 

 

Everything Gold Can Stay

Nature's first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to...

Tuesday, April 12, 2011 - 9:45am

Elizabeth Serkin is a lifelong seeker of learning and earned her PhD in feminist social gerontology at the age of 66. At the age of 68, she married "her last and best husband," who was 89. Her husband, now 91, goes to work every day. "He needs to be creative. He’s currently opening an art gallery," explains Dr. Serkin. Her own life is also filled with creative endeavors: she is writing a novel—a psychological thriller—and one of her favorite activities is leading storytelling circles for...

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Beautiful Minds
Thursday, April 7, 2011 - 12:43pm

Washington, DC's NPR station, WAMU 88.5, and Faces of Learning, a national grassroots engagement initiative that builds the capacity needed to support high-quality learning environments, have teamed up to create a series of short stories every Wednesday about Lifelong Learning.

Yesterday's segment featured Liz Lerman, founding artistic director of The Dance Exchance, and a familiar face to many of us in...

Tags:
Beautiful Minds
Friday, April 1, 2011 - 11:00am

If a tree falls in a forest and there’s no one to hear, does it really make a sound? If someone takes time to express something dear and no one ever knows about it, has it any value? In both scenarios, we’re talking about significance. Does significance require recognition other than to the object or person directly involved? That’s a good question.

An arts therapy group was discussing how each of them used their disciplines to help their clients. An older art therapist said her...

Tuesday, March 29, 2011 - 10:38am

The new PBS documentary Over 90 and Loving It features real stories of people over 90 who are thriving as athletes, musicians, advocates, and more. Filmmaker Susan Polis Schutz interviews some of the most incredible people you can imagine--people who aren't aware of chronological age at all, but live as though the future and youth spring eternal.

We sit at their feet for words of advice, witnessing how they forgot...

Tuesday, March 22, 2011 - 11:30am

I began the third act with a slight touch of gentle violin music, played in the darkness, as the lights ever so slowly and warmly came up on a forest scene. The music I chose was an old Yiddish melody whose words tell of a rebbe teaching the Hebrew alphabet to little children. The song in Yiddish is called "Oyfn Pripetchik." In the best of English translations this tune would be called "At the Hearth." And the strangest thing happened: the entire audience began singing the song in the...

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